share
Shop The Look

Breaking the Monotony in Indian Menswear

Designer Deepit Chugh and his small team, spread across Nalasopara to Bandra, craft experimental menswear pieces.

Words by:

Anicce Crasto

Photos by:

No items found.
Shop The Look

Everyone has their own entry into fashion and for Deepit Chugh it began with Yukta Mookhey. The fact that Mookhey, the winner of Miss World (1999), was his cousin—glossy and glitzy, yet within reach, transformed the otherwise touch-me-not relationship people have with Fashion and Stars. Chugh recalls being a ten-year-old enamoured by her outfits, particularly a gown designed by Hemant Trivedi. That singular moment was the precursor to multiple back-of-the-notebook outfit sketches that eventually led him to pursue fashion design from NIFT Delhi. Upon graduating in 2011, Chugh got a job at Raymond, a menswear brand. His time at the Indian clothing giant taught him crucial skills: namely how to identify and cater to the specifications of the customer. 

“I had to be super quick in understanding ‘Who is this Raymond customer?’” he says. It was here he grasped the value of imagery and branding. “The sensibilities of a customer vary not just with age, but also from region to region. The collection for the North of India may not work in the South,” he says, that too for something as ubiquitous as the hemlines found in basic menswear shirts.

Take Me Out

Let's not kid ourselves: Line Outline takes our breath away when it comes to how much the brand pays attention to the funkier aspects of what was once a dull line. Their garments are a sure-shot 'Take me out!'

No items found.
Shop the Look (3)
No items found.
No items found.

Going deep into the narrative, Chugh identified how the curved hemline of shirts—or the apple cut—was retracted from the South Indian market because the men there prefer shirts with straight-cut hemlines over their lungis. After five years with Raymond, he would go on to work with the Aditya Birla Group as a fashion designer for women’s wear.

Throughout those years, the most pertinent observation he made was the absence of a range offered to the men in India. This is why he started Line Outline. His challenge was to break the monotony in Indian menswear. The options for them oscillated between khadi-oriented menswear or just wedding wear. “They were offered nothing in between,” he says. To launch in the midst of the pandemic, was tricky business.

But Chugh kept chugging on. He approached known contacts and tailors. Some were willing to work from their sewing machines at home under restrictive lockdown conditions.

No items found.
Wafi wears a windowpane resort shirt, LINE OUTLINE; Patrick wears a panelled resort shirt, LINE OUTLINE, with a straight-fit pant, LINE OUTLINE.
Shop the Look
No items found.

The Bombay-based team came together organically: one tailor knew an embroiderer who knew a fellow embroiderer and so on. They coordinated over  WhatsApp and today his team is spread across Nalasopara to Bandra. He currently works with a small team—an assistant designer and three tailors—from a studio in Mulund in Bombay. 

Chugh’s take on sustainability is fresh in a world agog with climate concerns. Sustainability to him is the responsibility of any business owner to ensure a healthy work environment for their labour force. “Today when we talk about sustainability, the first thing you will ask is are your fabrics sustainable? But you can be sustainable in terms of how you run your business,” he says.

No items found.
Wafi wears a boxy blazer, LINE OUTLINE, with cotton silk trousers, SUKETDHIR.
No items found.
Shop the Look (3)
No items found.

Anicce Crasto

No items found.
By using this website, you agree to the storing of cookies on your device to enhance site navigation, analyze site usage, and assist in our marketing efforts. View our Privacy Policy for more information.